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Super User I Super User I
Super User I

What is the server life of a WordPress install?

Seems there is a direct correlation between the age of a WordPress website and the amount of time it takes to administer? The goal is of course to keep your WordPress running efficiently but at what point does it make sense to do a fresh WordPress install?

 

What is old (over the hill) for a WordPress install?

 

How much patching is too much patching?

 

How often do you put clients on a brand new WordPress install and migrate?

 

Am I crazy thinking that a major revision of WordPress requires a complete new install, database and migration?

 

...turns out that my two cents is worth less or more depending on the current exchange rate.

roy darling *my posts seem a lot shorter in my head

5 REPLIES 5
Super User I
Super User I

Re: What is the server life of a WordPress install?

Hello @rd!

 

I honestly just keep on patching. So far, *knock on wood* I haven't had any problems with any of my clients WordPress themes that I've used. Mostly because I normally pick themes that are well supported, which now days, I've been using Elementor Pro for the most part in creating pages. 

 

Use of the GoDaddy Pro tools, which creates a backup of the site, when changes are applied is very helpful and easy to fallback/restore if needs be. 

 

I would think new install is a bit much, but if you can create a staging WP, and go through the upgrade that way, and see if everything still works, then copy your staging over to your prod. 

 

That is my two cents!


Very Respectfully,

Drew Davis
Navy Veteran and Entrepreneur | GoDaddy Pro user | "Proud to be serving others!"

*** Please note that I offer free advice on this forum. Please feel free to give me KUDOS on this topic/discussion; mark my comment as ACCEPTED SOLUTION if you believe I've helped solved your issue. Thanks! ***
Super User II Super User II
Super User II

Re: What is the server life of a WordPress install?

Hey, @rd:

 

WordPress is a bit different than hard coded sites (HTML, ASP, CGI) because as long as you keep the WordPress core updated as new releases are pushed out, you are up to date.   It really is as simple as that.

 

Recently WordPress had a PHP bump -- the minimal version of PHP that was required to run WordPress.  With WP 5.2, the minimum supported PHP version is now 5.6.20.  Being 7.3 is the latest and greatest, that is still pretty generous.

 

An official "bump" hadn't been done in quite a while but even that was no big deal.   Unless clients were on servers that weren't keeping up or on *really* old themes/plugins.  There are even plugins that can test sites on various versions of PHP to know if there will be issues.

 

Being my clients are on solid WordPress hosting companies, this really wasn't an issue.  Only those on hosting that wasn't keeping up caused hassles.

 

Another thing to consider is regularly reviewing plugins to make sure the authors are testing up to the latest version of WordPress.  While plugins can still work past their stated tested versions, the more they fall behind the greater opportunity for conflicts to occur.  

 

I don't go far off the beaten path when it comes to plugins or  themes.  I tend to gravitate to premium offerings as they are better supported.  This way I don't have to worry about them keeping up as WordPress evolves.

 

So, there are really no worries with "patching" efforts catching up with you or having a cumulative negative impact over time.   If you keep up with updates as they are released -- you are good to go.

 

But, as you know, technology whizzes along and new developments will require customers to keep up.  That's part of this gig and clients have to make the effort (time and/or $$) to keep up.

 

Responsiveness and SSL comes to mind.  Neither were WP specific things but did become a necessary issues that, if you wanted to succeed,  required updating.   A new responsive theme and you had that covered.  And SSL is pretty painless too -- depending on your host of course.

 

When it comes to themes, keeping up visually is important as well.  I a believer in updating your "look" to keep up with trends and the ability to integrate new things as they become available.  Older themes may not have the functionality or flexibility as do newer themes.

 

While the core and functionality of WordPress and plugins can be up to date, you can still have a site that is a visual flashback to the 1990s.  Just ran into one of those this week and was able to cajole the owner into understanding that visual impact is just as important as functionality perception wise.

 

HTH! Smiley Wink

 

Judith
"Do one thing every day that scares you." ~ Eleanor Roosevelt

Super User III
Super User III

Re: What is the server life of a WordPress install?

@rd 

 

I've had several that have lasted years before I felt a need to completely wipe it and start over. Usually the change came because I just needed to completely redesign the site from scratch. I do that sometimes because I'm a nerd.

 

Like @Muse said, I tend to stick to premium offerings as far as themes and plugins go because as long as you keep everything up to date you're generally good to go with a few standard precautions. You rarely have a well-maintained WordPress site that gets hacked. (Also, go check out @Muse's site. It's super nice.)

 

 



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Super User I Super User I
Super User I

Re: What is the server life of a WordPress install?

Thanks for the input guys! Things there I had not considered.

 

Updating plugins that are not needed/required are often a bother. In the evolution of WordPress websites there are always plugins that are no longer used for the functionality of the website. These tend to just sit (clutter) the plugins page and even if disabled often still note that they require updating. When uninstalling plugin(s) there is often data left behind in database tables.

 

How much is too much plugin deletion before it is time for a refreshed WordPress install?

 

Do you feel like cleaning up orphaned tables from a WordPress database is required?

 

...turns out that my two cents is worth less or more depending on the current exchange rate.

roy darling *my posts seem a lot shorter in my head

Super User III
Super User III

Re: What is the server life of a WordPress install?

@rd 

 

Properly maintained, you honestly shouldn't have a reason to build a whole new site unless you're making changes to the fundamental functionality of the site. And I do believe that cleaning up transients and orphaned information from your database is essential.

 

Plugin data can be cleaned quite easily with several paid and free plugins that optimize the data base tables and get rid of unwanted leftovers from disabling/removing a plugin. 

 

Also, if there is a plugin on your site that you're no longer using, it needs to be deleted. It's not doing anything and it acts as a possible security issue. 



I am a GoDaddy End User - Just Like You
* Please note that I offer free advice on this forum. I DO NOT answer private messages. Please ask your question in the proper forum so the answer can assist EVERYONE in the community and not just you. Thanks! *

Once your issue is resolved,
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