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DNS SOA Expire Value out of recommended range

I/m trying to keep email from going directly to SPAM.   The only issue I see when I test the server's configuration is the the SOA Expire Value.  See https://mxtoolbox.com/domain/mail.mymobiledashboard.com/

 

It is set to 600 but the RFC says it should be 3600.  How do I get that changed?

 

Godaddy manages the DNS records and the server is elswhere.

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION
New

"DNS SOA Expire Value out of recommended range" is a setting on the root of DNS servers to govern how long a DNS server may hand out DNS records although it hasn't been able to query and confirm it's information against the Start of Authority.  Unless I am corrected by Go Daddy's system administrators, this value is set by them on their DNS servers that we use to host our information on the world wide web.  The personnel on the Go Daddy support desk probably does not have access to this primary level of DNS configuration.  When you look under Nameservers, you will see something like NS67.DOMAINCONTROL.COM, NS68.DOMAINCONTROL.COM.  Settings on these servers require the highest security and access control.

 

So.....although it is a little annoying to see that little orange exclamation mark: 

SOA Expire Value out of recommended range

...for now at least, it is probably safe to ignore.  I doubt we will convince Go Daddy otherwise to change their configuration.  As I have thought about this issue, Go Daddy probably has it "right".  Reason:  if a DNS record goes stale and no longer has a correspnding online resource, would you want your customers to get something like, "Page not found" or "Service is unavailable"?

 

Regarding the "spammyness" of email, I do not think this value holds much credibility.  There are many other settings to be concerned with.  Here are some to look into:

 

1.  SPF1 Records

2.  SPF2.0 Records

3.  DKIM Certificates

4.  DMARC Records

5.  rDNS (Reverse DNS)

 

Learning about these DNS records and email server configurations will go a long way to reducing the "spammyness" of your email.  Hotmail, Gmail, AOL and others can still be pretty tough when it comes to delivering 3rd party email to their clients' inboxes.  (Although, we all get junk from their users often Smiley Very Happy).  Even when you perfect the list above, you still may have to go to each provider and "request clearance" from delivering email to inboxes without hitting the Junk Mail folder or perhaps not being delivered at all.

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5 REPLIES 5
Moderator
Moderator

Hey @stratuspete,

 

The SOA set to 600 is minimum default. Unfortunately our own DNS control panel has no direct control over this value as it's a server side setting. 

In the end, I'm not sure this is going to be the ultimate solution to preventing your messages from going into SPAM folders as there are other factors to consider. TTL value is not usually a factor used to mark messages received by a mail server for SPAM. Instead I'd check something more general like the current reputation of the sending server's IP address from someplace like http://www.senderbase.org/lookup/. 

If you know the mail provider marking the messages for SPAM, you might also want to try reaching out to their general support for more information. They'll generally require a copy of the original email sent out as an attached file to review and point out other factors that could be flagging the mail. 

 

If any other members have experience with mail reputation or SPAM filtering, hopefully they'll be willing to share some of their experiences here to help out.

CG - GoDaddy | Community Moderator
24/7 support available at x.co/247support
Moderator
Moderator

Hey @stratuspete,

 

I just stumbled across some more information in another topic of discussion that might help you out. Check out My Emails Are Not Sent To Some Email Providers. Let us know if this worked out for you. 

CG - GoDaddy | Community Moderator
24/7 support available at x.co/247support

Sounds like you have spammy emails. You need a spam filter on your mail server and you DNS should be updated with a.

Sender Policy Framework

 

Entry. in the TXT record.

New

RFC1912 suggests 2-4 weeks.

GoDaddy 

SOA 'mname' nameserver (ns53.domaincontrol.com) is authoritative for my domain  zone.

SOA 'expire' value (604800) is higher than the minimum recommended value (604800) and not lower than the 'refresh' value (28800). 

 

SOA 'refresh' value (28800) is greater than the SOA 'retry' value (7200)

 

SOA 'mname' value (ns53.domaincontrol.com) refers to a  NS which is not an alias (CNAME).

 

It kind of screwed up, maybe for a reason of zone transfers 

New

"DNS SOA Expire Value out of recommended range" is a setting on the root of DNS servers to govern how long a DNS server may hand out DNS records although it hasn't been able to query and confirm it's information against the Start of Authority.  Unless I am corrected by Go Daddy's system administrators, this value is set by them on their DNS servers that we use to host our information on the world wide web.  The personnel on the Go Daddy support desk probably does not have access to this primary level of DNS configuration.  When you look under Nameservers, you will see something like NS67.DOMAINCONTROL.COM, NS68.DOMAINCONTROL.COM.  Settings on these servers require the highest security and access control.

 

So.....although it is a little annoying to see that little orange exclamation mark: 

SOA Expire Value out of recommended range

...for now at least, it is probably safe to ignore.  I doubt we will convince Go Daddy otherwise to change their configuration.  As I have thought about this issue, Go Daddy probably has it "right".  Reason:  if a DNS record goes stale and no longer has a correspnding online resource, would you want your customers to get something like, "Page not found" or "Service is unavailable"?

 

Regarding the "spammyness" of email, I do not think this value holds much credibility.  There are many other settings to be concerned with.  Here are some to look into:

 

1.  SPF1 Records

2.  SPF2.0 Records

3.  DKIM Certificates

4.  DMARC Records

5.  rDNS (Reverse DNS)

 

Learning about these DNS records and email server configurations will go a long way to reducing the "spammyness" of your email.  Hotmail, Gmail, AOL and others can still be pretty tough when it comes to delivering 3rd party email to their clients' inboxes.  (Although, we all get junk from their users often Smiley Very Happy).  Even when you perfect the list above, you still may have to go to each provider and "request clearance" from delivering email to inboxes without hitting the Junk Mail folder or perhaps not being delivered at all.

View solution in original post