Much ado about website design

A rose by any other name

Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them. And today, greatness cannot be truly fulfilled without having a digital identity.

I took control of my personal digital identity by building this website and want to show you how and why I did it.

GoDaddy’s Website Builder was a natural choice for me. Aside from being easy to use and quick to roll out, it allowed me to press my own creative stamp on it. I opted for the arts and culture template, reflective of my passion and zest for literature and creativity.

I’ve included links to where my work can be bought, and am able to track who has clicked to purchase with ease. As a writer I’m often scraping the pennies at the end of the month, so a little shameless self-promotion to support my lifestyle goes a long way.

It’s a constant challenge to remain relevant, so to show I’ve got my finger on the pulse, I opted for one of the newer domain extensions.today. It seemed to fit perfectly and shows how current and hip I am … obviously. My eternally youthful spirit is conveyed far better than the age-old domain extensions (.com, .org and .net) would allow, and it’s also more memorable.

The inclusion of Yelp® reviews on my home page promotes where my plays are performed, with viewers able to add reviews and spread the word. I’ve also got a blog for people to keep track of my day-to-day life outside of the writing world.

Of course, I’ve included a link to my Twitter® feed, the modern man’s equivalent of a quill. Combined with my Vine videos, I’ve made sure that my fans are able to see a little more of my personality and get in touch with me, should they wish. They also know where to find me, through a Google® map showing where I can be found.

To go online or not to go online, there is no question! Create your own website today.

William Shakespeare
Will Shakespeare (aka the "Bard of Avon") is a true entrepreneur, a world-renowned poet and playwright. His work continues to inspire creativity and innovation -- although he died almost 400 years ago. The rest is silence.