The top 25 most expensive domain names

High-dollar domains

Updated: Oct. 29, 2018 — Have you ever heard about those people who just magically find rare steals at antique roadshows? Like the Joseph Kleitsch oil painting that was purchased for around $100 and later appraised at $500,000. If you’re like me, and in this case, I think we all are, you’ve probably thought to yourself, “Why can’t that happen to me?” While I don’t typically dabble in oil paintings, I do spend time in the domain market. And let me tell you, after reviewing the most expensive domain names out there, there are definitely people who have sold them for enough money to pay a king’s ransom.

When most people think about the price of a domain, somewhere in the range of $15 usually pops up. But often, domain names sell for much more than that.

The average price of a domain name sold in the secondary market — buying a domain from someone who already owns it — is in the thousands of dollars.

It is not unusual to see public domain sales reported weekly in the tens or hundreds of thousands, and often enough there will be domain sales reported in the millions. You can check out dnjournal.com for weekly domain sales reporting, as well as annual historical sales reports. They report this year’s top sale as Ice.com for $3.5 million, for instance. It is always good use this report to see current sales and trends.

Nailing down the most expensive domain names isn’t easy — most of the parties involved often try to keep that information private. There are various reasons for this practice, ranging from wanting to keep their competition in the dark to not wanting others to know how much they’re willing to spend on a domain in the future.

It’s a pretty common assertion that the vast majority of high-value domain sales are done with some sort of non-disclosure agreement in place. Luckily for us, enough sales are public, so we can still have a good idea of the domain market and its health over the years.

The No.1 spot

Most Expensive Domain Names Number One

The most expensive domain name ever sold has come to light — at $872 million. Yes, you read that right. Cars.com was valued at $872 million (we get that number from reading the SEC filing, courtesy of the parent company, Gannet Co., Inc.). Imagine the look on someone’s face when they were told their domain was worth that much!

While many people don’t report the sale of their domains publicly, top lists vary. But as a whole, most people are in agreement with most of the highest sales reported for domain names.

Editor’s note: Want to capture the coveted No. 1 spot in domain name sales? You’ll need to make sure your domains are worth their weight. With GoDaddy Domain Appraisals, you can get the most accurate and comprehensive domain pricing estimates available. We use an exclusive algorithm that relies on both machine learning and real market sales data to estimate domain values.

25 most expensive domain names publicly reported

Here are the 25 most expensive domain names publicly reported.

  1. CarInsurance.com — $49.7 million

  2. Insurance.com — $35.6 million

  3. VacationRentals.com — $35 million

  4. PrivateJet.com — $30.18 million

  5. Internet.com — $18 million

  6. 360.com — $17 million

  7. Insure.com — $16 million

  8. Fund.com — £9.99 million

  9. Sex.com — $14 million*

  10. Sex.com — $13 million

  11. Hotels.com — $11 million

  12. Porn.com — $9.5 million

  13. Shoes.com — $9 million

  14. Porno.com — $8.8 million

  15. Fb.com — $8.5 million

  16. We.com — $8 million

  17. Business.com — $7.5 million

  18. Diamond.com — $7.5 million

  19. Beer.com — $7 million

  20. Z.com — $6.8 million

  21. iCloud.com — $6 million

  22. Israel.com — $5.8 million

  23. Casino.com — $5.5 million

  24. Slots.com — $5.5 million

  25. Toys.com — $5.1 million

Please note that we’ve added five domain names to the list since we originally published this post in 2017. 

* The sex.com domain name sold twice — Once in 2005 for $14 million and again in 2010 for $13 million. 

Domain Price Sale date
CarInsurance.com $49.7 million 2010
Insurance.com $35.6 million 2010
VacationRentals.com $35 million 2007
PrivateJet.com $30.1 million 2012
Internet.com $18 million 2009
360.com $17 million 2015
Insure.com $16 million 2009
Fund.com £9.99 million 2008
Sex.com $14 million 2005
Sex.com $13 million 2010
Hotels.com $11 million 2001
Porn.com $9.5 million 2007
Shoes.com $9  million 2017
Porno.com $8.8 million 2015
Fb.com $8.5 million 2010
We.com $8 million 2015
Business.com $7.5 million 1999
Diamond.com $7.5 million 2006
Beer.com $7 million 2004
Z.com $6.8 million 2014
iCloud.com $6 million 2011
Israel.com $5.8 million 2008
Casino.com $5.5 million 2003
Slots.com $5.5 million 2010
Toys.com $5.1 million 2009

**Data courtesy of Wikipedia and Namebio.com

What is your domain name worth?

Now that you know what domain names can potentially sell for, I bet you’re wondering what your domain name is worth. Check out NameBio.com — you can search by a specific domain or word and use various filters to find sold domains closely related to the one you’re thinking of selling. You can also check GoDaddy’s domain valuation tool to get an idea of the resale value of your domains.

If you are thinking about buying a domain name and selling it for more money, GoDaddy Auctions is a great place to find domains that might have good resale value. As with any other purchase, it’s always best to start slow and do your homework before spending your hard earned money and time looking for the next big domain sale.

Start your search today.

 


Also published on Medium.

Image by: 401(K) 2013 via VisualHunt.com / CC BY-SA

Joe Styler
Joe Styler serves as product manager for the aftermarket at GoDaddy. He’s responsible for marketplace products including any purchase, sale, or monetization of a domain name. During his nine-year tenure at GoDaddy Joe has served in a variety of directorial and supervisory roles. His passion is seeing his customers become successful in their business goals when using the aftermarket. He has been interested helping people with transactions on the Internet for more than 20 years. Joe received his B.A. from Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, and his Masters in Divinity from Gordon Conwell in Massachusetts.